Alcana in Europe

In June, our in-house photographer Vitoria had the opportunity to take Alcana to the European summer, from the stone-paved streets of Paris, to the narrow alleyways of Barcelona, to the quietly urban streets of Cologne, to the expansive fields of Tuscany, she had the chance to meet incredible creative women and photograph them in Alcana, and we asked her to share her experience abroad.

_DSF5474.jpg

A quick trip to Florence wearing the Zikdi slip dress. It was my second time around bubbly, busy Florence, the sun was unbelievably kind and Ponte Vecchio was as stunning as ever in its muted shades of yellow

_DSF5516.jpg
_DSF5459.jpg

When I got to Cologne, Germany, I had the opportunity to meet several creatives, incredible women such as Vivien, who together with lovely Noelle were responsible for Nectar, an artist duo creating soft, mellow images. I asked them both to style some Alcana pieces and it was interesting to see them worn in such a different context, such as in this slightly retro, urban take by Vivi.

IMG_1554-Edit.jpg
IMG_1544.jpg
IMG_1665-Edit.jpg
IMG_1684-Edit.jpg

And then there was beautiful Noelle, the other part of Nectar. We shot just behind Mayara’s apartment, in a beautiful sun-drenched garden despite inquisitive looks from neighbours having their afternoon tea on their balconies. Noelle wears the Way Shirt from SS18.

IMG_1649.jpg

Still in Cologne, I met Mayara, an aspiring designer from Brazil. As it is when you meet someone from your motherland as a stranger on strange lands, the bond was instantaneous. We became great friends (and I ended up being hosted by her for a week!) and, of course, I asked her if she’d be interested to shoot (this is what happens when you make friends with a photographer). She inevitably fell in love with the philosophy behind Alcana and we went out on the streets for a bit of an urban shoot. Her piece of choice was the Safflower Wrap Jumpsuit - it fit her like a glove and meshed really well with the laid back vibe of Cologne.

IMG_1214.jpg
All across the city you can find this banana graffited on walls, buildings, fences. It’s become a cultural icon of sorts.

All across the city you can find this banana graffited on walls, buildings, fences. It’s become a cultural icon of sorts.

From Germany, back to Italy I went. My cousin, who’s been living in the beautiful province of Lucca for the past 20 years, took me on a wonderful roadtrip across some incredible little villages around Tuscany. As she’s an experienced photographer, she got me in front of the lens for a bit and we spent the whole day shooting to our heart’s content. Nothing will get your heart beating quite as fast as doing an impromptu road photoshoot in which you blindly trust that the photographer will be on the lookout to ensure you don’t get dramatically run over. Regardless, this place was absolutely beautiful. In our little adventure together, me and my cousin Isabella drove past several marble-heavy mountains engulfing the road until we decided that we needed to photograph at least in front of one.

IMG_2273.jpg
IMG_2250-Edit.jpg
Ponte della Maddalena aka Ponte Del Diavolo - or Devil’s bridge. It served as part of an early medieval road to Rome or those coming from France and it was an important pilgrimage route. The water was an incredible shade of turquoise, and the bridge itself is a remarkable example of medieval engineering. It looked straight out of a fairytale, maybe save from when the train rode past and its horn gave me the scare of a lifetime and I almost tumbled backwards (would not recommend). Here pictured is the Tanda Tie Up cami (which I practically lived in during my trip).

Ponte della Maddalena aka Ponte Del Diavolo - or Devil’s bridge. It served as part of an early medieval road to Rome or those coming from France and it was an important pilgrimage route. The water was an incredible shade of turquoise, and the bridge itself is a remarkable example of medieval engineering. It looked straight out of a fairytale, maybe save from when the train rode past and its horn gave me the scare of a lifetime and I almost tumbled backwards (would not recommend). Here pictured is the Tanda Tie Up cami (which I practically lived in during my trip).

Finally, after a very full day, we got to the coast to have some chips (thank goodness). We found ourselves in a lovely beach club which was completely empty (by then it was nearly 10pm, don’t let the summer lightness fool you!). The sunset was spectacular and I was awash with gratitude. The last look we shot was the Paiya Kaftan in seafoam. I find the name chosen for the fabric so incredibly fitting. The way it flows and moves like it has a mind of its own, how delicate and soft it is, how it gently clings to the body with the evening breeze.  After Italy I made my way to Barcelona, which was my final destination before I headed back to Melbourne, but needless to say Europe and its sunny disposition might just have stolen a sizeable chunk of this heart of mine.

Finally, after a very full day, we got to the coast to have some chips (thank goodness). We found ourselves in a lovely beach club which was completely empty (by then it was nearly 10pm, don’t let the summer lightness fool you!). The sunset was spectacular and I was awash with gratitude. The last look we shot was the Paiya Kaftan in seafoam. I find the name chosen for the fabric so incredibly fitting. The way it flows and moves like it has a mind of its own, how delicate and soft it is, how it gently clings to the body with the evening breeze.

After Italy I made my way to Barcelona, which was my final destination before I headed back to Melbourne, but needless to say Europe and its sunny disposition might just have stolen a sizeable chunk of this heart of mine.

Hannah MitchellComment