The No Waste Project

One of my greatest hobbies as a girl was op shopping with Mum and turning old jeans into skirts, curtains into cushions, cushions into jackets and so on. I love mending and re making, I think its amazing how you can bring a garment back to life by adding something or changing the shape. I always made hair scrunchies or other accessories out of the scrap fabric from garments Mum had made me as a girl, so I was very excited when I realised I can re live some of these fun childhood memories on a larger scale and offer a range of accessories from the off cuts of our designs, I seriously live in the terracotta head scarf.

Ever since we made the first range of samples I have held on to every scrap to see how much is left at the end of every garment. There are many ideas for the scarp fabric from patchwork throws, to reusable shopping bags, to scrunchies and more. 

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We are constantly working on intricate lay plans to maximise the use of fabric used for each small production run, but there will always be scraps left over and my goal is to use every bit. 

It’s incredible how much textile waste ends up in landfill each year. Data collected informs that at least 95% of that waste that finds itself in landfills could actually be recycled - whether repurposed or used for the fibres. Eventually, the built up waste laying on landfill breaks down as it decomposes and releases toxic chemicals such as ammonia and methane, which are detrimental to the soil and to the air we breathe. So the effort to make every little bit of our beautiful fabrics count is more urgent than you’d think.

We got Vitoria, our resident photographer, to take some snaps of her beautiful silver haired mother Licia for a fun little styling session on a few different ways to wear our No Waste Headscarves for some inspiration:

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Next week we are participating in a workshop about sustainable styling and design and all proceeds go to the local school to help teach the girls how to sew and re-use, mend and up-cycle clothes. This is a wonderful way to get young women interested and excited about creating and styling their own wardrobe. We are very passionate not only about producing a beautiful hand crafted garment, but also about the story of it, from the cutting and left over fabric to the way it is looked after, mended and re-used for many years to come.



Hannah Mitchell